Christopher Brant Anderson

 

 December , 2011 issue of VICTORY REVIEW ON LINE MAGAZINE

Singer/Songwriter

Chris Anderson: Gravity & Time

ChristopherBrantAnderson.com

If you'd like thte conclusion of this review, I'll hand it to you as the introduction.  "Gravity & Time" is a masterpiece of songwriting, performance, production and musicianship.  It has a rhythm to it that ebbs and flows from lightness and celebration to the inky darkness of dispair ( and murder, in the stark performance of Dylan's "Ballad of Hollis Brown".

Chris Anderson is veteran singer-songwriter, and most recently, producer on the Puget Sound music scene, and he has brought all that disparte musical voices he has becom so proficient at rendering into one beautiflly crafted vehicle in a way that shows no strain or awkwardness in the process.  Simply stated, it is one of the best albums I have listened to in the last 10 years.  It is without doubt Anderson's most ambitious project in terms of production values and includes some serious musical sidemen, including master keyboardist Barney McClure and Jazz and Blues guitar wizard Mike Nelson.

In addition to McClure and Nelson, the album features keith Pasculli on Bass and Lance DeMers on drums and percussion, both whom perform with Chris as part of his regular band, a fact that may explain the almost efforless smooth accompaniment displayed throughout the CD.  In addition, two members of theTotal Expericene Gospel Choir (Josephine Howell and Camila Reccchio) lend their cosiderable talent to the lonesome ballad "Where's Love Go" to great efffect.  Present as well is Skye Anderson, who teams up with her Grandfather in a great rendition of "Down by the Old Mill Stream" in a manner that further enhances the very personal feel of this CD.

So, what is it like?  "Gravity & Time" in the final analysis is a bit of Jazz, some deep Blues, a dash of Pop and a snippet of Folk.  it is drenched in musicianship, loaded with personality and brimming with great songs.  It is very, very good.  Grammy good.

{John C. McClure}

hm to it that ebbs and flows from lightness and

 

 

of Hollis Brown”).

Chris Anderson is a veteran singer-songwriter, and most recently, producer on the Puget Sound music scene, and he has brought all the disparate musical voices he has become so proficient at rendering into one beautifully crafted vehicle in a way that shows no strain or awkwardness in the process. Simply stated, it is one of the best albums I have listened to in the last 10 years. It is without doubt Anderson’s most ambitious project in terms of production values and includes some serious musical sidemen, including master keyboardist Barney McClure and Jazz and Blues guitar wizard Mike Nelson.

In addition to McClure and Nelson, the album features Keith Pasculli on Bass and Lance Demers on drums and percussion, both of whom perform with Chris as part of his regular band, a fact that may explain the almost effortless smooth accompaniment displayed throughout the CD. In addition, two members of the Total Experience Gospel Choir (Josephine Howell and Camila Recchio) lend their considerable talent to the lonesome ballad “Where’s Love Go” to great effect. Present as well is Skye Anderson, who teams up with her Grandfather in a great rendition of “Down by the Old Mill Stream” in a manner that further enhances the very personal feel of this CD.

So, what is it like? “Gravity and Time” in the final analysis is a bit of Jazz, some deep Blues, a dash of Pop and a snippet of Folk. It is drenched in musicianship, loaded with personality and brimming with great songs. It is very, very good. Grammy good.

[John C. McClure]

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ancient Victorys CD Review

Volume 4, Issue 3-Fall 2011

CHRISTOPHER BRANT ANDERSON

GRAVITY & TIME

CD RS-5455-02

RainStation Records

17350 Hwy 106, Belfair, WA 98528

WWW.CHRISTOPHERBRANTANDERSON.COM

Fans of Northwest male singer/songwriter pop in the Murante, Kevin Jones, Jeff Tassin vein will be at home with this singer/songwriter production.  "Sweet Little Mystery" is about how we are moved by what we don't know but suspect down in someone's heart.  Anderson has a good concept of full production and also mixes well.  The sound moves and is both listenable and danceable on this John Martyn tune.  "Rembrandt Light", is one of many Anderson originals.  The vision is how you see at the moment as someone comes into view that the person has that special light.  Kevin Veatch again does stellar lead work.  The recording is squeaky clean and clear.  Anderson has gotten his diction and clarity down very well and can carry his songs.  He has always been able to have a rhythmic lick and then extend after. "Try Not To Rust", comes in lightly just a bit above the talking style song.  There is a nice back beat as the bass and drums join.  As the song develops and the chorus moves, the Barney McClure Hammond B3 touch is perfect, then the release and build again.  The premise is, if you are out of touch, how do you finish and survive.  Bass solo with organ underneath is a nice change leading into the next verse.  "Quarter Heart Time" is a slow kind of a mood not unlike some jazz artists give to "Miss Oties Regrets".  The McClure organ licks are the perfect voice to flush.  Would like the vocal just a bit more out front on this one.  Love the song and McClure's piano support ala jazz mood.  Elsewhere, we have a CD tribute by NW artist on the work of Ron Davies and Anderson here delivers Davies' "Somebody's Watchin'."  With the suspicion that eyes are on you.  McClure is on piano and Keith Pasculli's bass is the lead here tying it all down.  McClure is down home blues, New Orleans suspicious style, and promps the closing ala Baby Gramps.  "Under The Covers" just strolls along with a sing -along mood and bringing you in for a relaxed stroll.  Easy going, uncomplicated pop music.  "Where's Love Go" brings back McClure on Hammond and piano, wihich he opens in a kind of lonely bar mood.  Then it moves toward a gospel chorus in a slow, insinuating mood.  Your house is no longer hoome, and where it all go?  Barney moves some of the Hammmond b sustaining the background and then soloing in a forceful choral church mood.  Sad, lovely, haunting song that could be done as a jazz ballad also.  Anderson's vocal and writing lends itself to jazz potentioal, but there is no money in those hills.  But he obviously has a feel in that direction; the way McClure responds to his work shows that trend.  "Woman Like You", uses the bass slide note and chord to open the tune about a woman you will have to keep thinking about, that gets in your spirit.  "Barbara's Garden" has acoustic guitar and chiming chords with the bass descending in with almost an Indian touch.  Guitar, harmonica, violin build from a repetitive old-world percussion that is swirling, hesitating, hold and run.  Very nice instrumental mood.  "My Shore" is a typical folk songwriter tune with Anderson biting down and then the instrumental building with violin, mandolin, and harmonica.  The song is a easygoing painted picture with Anderson letting the moothness of his vocal style get a bit folk country, but still in his particular pop concept.  Dylan's "Hollis Brown' has Mike Nelson on slide guitar and Mike Derzon on mandolin and harmonica.  Anderson brings his own way of building the song and yet maintaining the dire strait of the song.  This is probly the song furthest outside the norm of the other songs, but it works, and most will welcome the intersting arrangement with bass and mandolin.  "Dakota Ascent is an Anderson/DeMers collaboration with percussion dominating.  The hidden track has family in a lovely, charming "Down By The Old Mill Stream".  This recording is a solid entry in the contmporary music markent, with thoughtful writing, arrangements, clean recording, top-flight musicianship by all the players, good production and balance.  Anderson has worked at his craft, and it is really showing.  His best, most diversified, and thought-out work yet.   (Chris Lunn)

 

 

Attic Sessions

“Don’t let your dog run on Porcupine Hill” starts us off with a great acoustic country feel. The Attic Sessions CD was recorded at Rabbit Hole Studios — now there’s a geographical oddity. Chris is a long time local musician from the peninsula of Washington State. Anderson is ably backed by

Jane Melin on Violin, Jeremy Rothbaum on piano, Tony Handy on drums, Keith Pasculli on bass, cello by Glen Melin and a bunch of those stringy things (mandolin, etc.) by Mike Derzon.  Background vocals are by Christine Salazar, and Chris. ‘You Go, I’ll Stay’ is one of those decisive moments at the end of a relationship.  Chris has a great, warm voice and I love the bass and piano work behind ‘The Light’.  ‘Sail on Blue’ is a sailing analogy with the lilting, muted trumpet of Mike Derzon. ‘Pioneer Square’ is a vocalist’s moment, a song to love lost. ‘Friends’ demonstrates Chris’s willingness to engage in plain talk.  “Everyone needs a pal…”  Nice piano on that one. ‘Dream #38’ has nice guitar which slinks down into bluesy riffs. If I count correctly, this is the fifth album for Christopher Brant Anderson and a very personal one at that. Look for Chris at a gig near you.

J.W. McClure, Victory Music, December 2010

 

Christopher Brant Anderson Trio

To close out the evening, Christopher Brant Anderson treated us to his brand of sometimes jazzy, always professional smooth delivery of music. Chris delivers his own tunes, and plays both a Takamine cutaway and an F hole Archtop for accompaniment. Lance DeMers on the drum kit included lots of textures, woodblock, cowbell, tambourine, though never overpowering the vocals or guitar. And Keith Pasculli on the bass -- well, I thought it was a fretless bass, but no, it was just a really good player being sensitive to the needs of the tunes.

Whether he's tongue in cheek or heartfelt, Chris' delivery is that of a total pro.

Victory Music, October 2010